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Boldheart Australian Shepherds is located in Arizona. Our dogs are part of our family and live with us or in co-own homes. We strive to maintain the substance and type of the standard Australian shepherd but in a smaller package. Our mini aussies can do a full day's work, compete in agility,showing,herding, flyball, and therapy as well as be your constant shadow and best friend. Whatever venue you choose your mini aussie should excel. Thank you for considering a Kings Castle puppy! We strive to produce puppies with sound structure, good temperaments, and correct aussie type. Our puppies are handled daily on an individual basis, so we get to know their personalities and can help place them in a suitable family.  Our puppies are placed on a spay/neuter contract  They are well socialized, up to date on vaccinations and worming, and come with a health guarantee.   Our mini Australian shepherds are registered with IMASC,  MASCA, ASDR, and/or AKC as Australian shepherds not miniature American shepherds.

The Australian Shepherd, commonly known as the Aussie, is a breed of dog that was developed on ranches in the western United States. Despite its name, the breed was not developed in Australia, but rather in the United States where they were seen in the West as early as the 1800s. The breed rose gradually in popularity with the boom of western riding after World War I. They became known to the general public through rodeos, horse shows, and Disney movies made for television. For many years, Aussies have been valued by stock men for their versatility and train ability. While they continue to work as stock dogs and compete in herding trials, the breed has earned recognition in other roles due to their train ability and eagerness to please, and are highly regarded for their skills in obedience. Like all working breeds, the Aussie has considerable energy and drive, and usually needs a job to do. It often excels at dog sports such as dog agility, fly ball, and frisbee. They are also highly successful search and rescue dogs, disaster dogs, detection dogs, guide, service, and therapy dogs. Here at Boldheart Australian Shepherds I am a preservation breeder and strive to improve the breed with each litter.

The Australian Shepherd: Though most facts are shrouded in time, the most commonly held belief on the origins of the Aussie begin in the late 1800's when western ranchers were importing sheep from Australia. During this period the most popular sheep were being imported into Australia from the Basque regions of Spain. When the herds were shipped, their shepherds were sent with them to manage and care for the flocks on the journey. As the Australian's reputation for quality sheep grew, the demand for their sheep grew also and American ranchers began importing them. The livestock were shipped to the Americas, again accompanied by the Basque shepherds and their herding dogs. Ranchers of the American west were reportedly very impressed with the working ability of these "little blue dogs" and began interbreeding them with their own shepherd dogs. The result was the Australian Shepherd.

In 1976, a single Breed Standard for the Australian Shepherd was adopted and in 1980 the two major breed clubs consolidated to become the Australian Shepherd Club of America (ASCA). Unrecognized by the American Kennel Club(AKC) at that time, ASCA not only provided a registry for the Aussie, but held conformation, obedience, agility, and working trials. Although the AKC now recognizes the Australian Shepherd, ASCA continues to provide these activities to the Australian Shepherd and is currently the largest single breed registry in the United States.

A Letter to Breeders

Dear Dog, and other animal, Breeders,

Over the past few years, dog breeders have been included in much controversy, and I want to take a minute to address all “serious” dog breeders
directly:

Thank you!  Thank you! Thank you!  You have so deeply enriched and improved my life, and the lives of nearly every person I know, and I want to
encourage and implore each and every one of you to keep breeding and know that your efforts are well recognized and understood by many of
us, even if that truth is sometimes lost in the clamor…

Dog breeders are often vilified by Animal Rights zealots, by well-meaning but woefully misguided members of the public who have been persuaded
that breeders are causing overpopulation and filling shelters, by rescuers and shelter workers whose views of the world have become so skewed
by the war they are waging that they have lost all perspective, and by those in the media who prefer drama to truth.

Breeders are the solution, not the problem. You are the true heroes stewarding the present and the future of dogs.  You are the ones creating
healthy, well-structured animals with great temperaments and excellent early socialization. You are the ones funding health research. You are the
ones devoting your lives and resources to the betterment of the species. You are the ones who put in twenty hour days giving your puppies
everything and then wake up three times during the night to check on them. You are the ones whose dogs are virtually never in shelters because
you do such a good job screening and placing and taking back dogs. You are the ones who have virtually eliminated overpopulation within your
realm and in fact created a shortage of good dogs such that it often takes years of waiting before a puppy is available.

That another, completely unrelated, group of idiots allows their dogs to keep reproducing for no good reason and filling shelters; that a few profit-
driven miscreants breed countless dogs in horrid conditions; that rescues and shelters keep placing horrific dogs in homes so that they bounce
back and keep the system full; that naivety motivates the unnatural and unsustainable notion of no-kill, that by nature dogs produce more puppies
than are needed and so some excess and attrition are unavoidable—these things are not your fault!

Yes, there are issues that breeders need to improve—breeding towards extremes, prioritizing the wrong goals, breeding too young, over-breeding
certain lines, placing excessive value on breed purity, hostility towards differing opinions, elitist attitudes, undervaluing balance—and I hope
breeders will continue to improve.  And yes, there are some awful breeders out there.  But all in all, it is you who have created the wonderful dogs
of today, and you who will create the wonderful dogs of tomorrow, and my gratitude for that is nearly boundless. And while there are some lovely
accidentally bred dogs in shelters (I have a few!), and some awful dogs being produced by breeders, at the end of the day the quality of dogs
generally being produced by careful breeders is leaps and bounds higher than what is generally available in shelters.

All the mindless anti-breeder rhetoric is nothing more than misleading hate-mongering that points the blame in the wrong direction: if breeders,
and the public, buy into this mindless propaganda, we will lose all the good dogs in a few years, with virtually no reduction in the number of poorly
bred dogs filling the shelters.

So please, keep up the good work and know how much you and your hard work are appreciated. And above all, know that the fabulous creatures
you produce are dearly loved and valued.

Taken from talentedanimals.com

If you think PETA really cares about animals, think again!

PETA QUOTES

“The cat, like the dog, must disappear… We should cut the
domestic cat free from our dominance by neutering, neutering, and
more neutering, until our pathetic version of the cat ceases to
exist.” –John Bryant, Fettered Kingdoms: An Examination of A
Changing Ethic (Washington, DC: People for the Ethical Treatment
of Animals (PeTA), 1982), p. 15.”

“Let us allow the dog to disappear from our brick and concrete
jungles–from our firesides, from the leather nooses and chains
by which we enslave it.” –John Bryant, Fettered Kingdoms: An
Examination of A Changing Ethic (Washington, DC: People for the
Ethical Treatment of Animals (PeTA), 1982), p. 15.

“You don’t have to own squirrels and starlings to get enjoyment
>from them … One day, we would like an end to pet shops and the
breeding of animals. [Dogs] would pursue their natural lives in
the wild .. they would have full lives, not wasting at home for
someone to come home in the evening and pet them and then sit
there and watch TV,” — Ingrid Newkirk, national director, People
for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PeTA), Chicago Daily

HSUS QUOTES“

We have no ethical obligation to preserve the different breeds of livestock produced through selective breeding …One
generation and out. We have no problems with the extinction of domestic animals. They are creations of human selective
breeding.” – CEO Wayne Pacelle, as reported in Animal People News, May1993

“I don’t have a hands-on fondness for animals. I did not grow up bonded to any particular nonhuman animal. I like them and I pet
them and I’m kind to them, but there’s no special bond between me and other animals…” – CEO Wayne Pacelle in Bloodties,
1994 The AR’s anti-pet ownership Agenda.After

Where and Why

The Australian Shepherd: The history of the North American/Miniature Australian Shepherd actually begins with the
history of the Australian Shepherd. Though most facts are shrouded in time, the most commonly held belief on the
origins of the Aussie begin in the late 1800’s when western ranchers were importing sheep from Australia. During this
period the most popular sheep were being imported into Australia from the Basque regions of Spain. When the herds
were shipped, their shepherds were sent with them to manage and care for the flocks on the journey. As the Australian’s
reputation for quality sheep grew, the demand for their sheep grew also and American ranchers began importing them.
The livestock were shipped to the Americas, again accompanied by the Basque shepherds and their herding dogs.
Ranchers of the American west were reportedly very impressed with the working ability of these "little blue dogs" and
began interbreeding them with their own shepherd dogs. The result was the Australian Shepherd.

In 1976, a single Breed Standard for the Australian Shepherd was adopted and in 1980 the two major breed clubs
consolidated to become the Australian Shepherd Club of America (ASCA). Unrecognized by the American Kennel Club
(AKC) at that time, ASCA not only provided a registry for the Aussie, but held conformation, obedience, agility, and
working trials. Although the AKC now recognizes the Australian Shepherd, ASCA continues to provide these activities to
the Australian Shepherd and is currently the largest single breed registry in the United States.

The Miniature Australian Shepherd was developed directly from the Australian Shepherd. Throughout the history of the
Aussie, small (under 18") dogs can be seen in historical photographs. Many believe that the original Aussie was
selectively bred larger as sheep ranching decreased and cattle ranching increased. Cattle ranchers preferred a larger
dog to work the larger stock. Some Aussie owners have continued to prefer the smaller sized Aussie while others prefer
the larger.

In 1968 a horse woman in Norco, California, began a breeding program specifically to produce very small Australian
Shepherds. Her name was Doris Cordova, and the most well known dog from her kennel is Cordova’s Spike. Spike was
placed with Bill and Sally Kennedy, also of Norco, California, to continue to develop a line of miniature Aussies under the
B/S kennel name. Another horseman, Chas Lasater of Valhalla Kennels soon joined the ranks of mini breeders.


Cordova, Lasater and the Kennedy’s together attempted to form the first parent club for the miniatures. Although the
club never quite got off the ground, their stated purpose for developing the miniatures was to produce an Australian
Shepherd under 17" who had the heart, intelligence and drive to work stock, and yet be small enough to travel easily to
stock shows and be a "house" dog.

Cordova’s dogs were registered through the National Stock Dog Registry (NSDR) and eventually NSDR came to be the
first registry to recognize and register the mini as a size variety of the Australian Shepherd.

Originally recognized in (1989   -  1990) they were shown with the RBKC of Southern California (Rare Breed Kennel
Club) as Miniature Australian Shepherds.  The miniature gained in popularity and the owners and breeders missed  the
cohesive nature of a parent club dedicated to the miniature, so in 1990, the Miniature Australian Shepherd Club of the
USA (MASCUSA) was formed.  Kathy Croswhite (Munson), Jeanine Perron, Florence Toombs, Susan Sinclair and
Richard VanBurkleo served as the first Board of Directors, and one of   MASCUSA’s most notable early achievements
during that time, was to gain recognition of the miniature by the American Rare Breeds Assc. (ARBA) to provide a
Nationally recognized conformation show venue.

Now with the recognition of the American Rare Breed Association (ARBA) the Miniature Australian Shepherds showed
along side the Australian Shepherd until 1993, when the AKC officially recognized the Australian Shepherd.  The
American Rare Breed Association's policy at that time was not to allow any breed of dog to show with them (except in
exhibition) that had the same name as an AKC affiliated breed and suggested that we change our name.  Amid mixed
reactions MASCUSA opted to change the name of our dogs from Miniature Australian Shepherd to North American
Shepherd, for the sole purpose of keeping ARBA as one of our main show venues.  At the same time, the club amended
its name to North American Miniature Australian Club, USA, while also retaining the name Miniature Australian Club, USA
as an a.k.a.   The breed flourished over the next five years and grew under this name both in the US and Canada.

In the beginning of 1998, ARBA changed their breed name policy and through much consideration and discussion on
the part of our club members and the Board of Directors of NASCUSA, formerly MASCUSA, Miniature Australian
Shepherd was incorporated back into the name of our dogs, thus becoming the North American "Miniature Australian
Shepherd".

Today, breeders of the Miniature Australian Shepherd continue to strive to produce Aussies of a smaller stature.
Preservation of the herding instinct as well as the intelligence and athleticism of the mini is a priority in breeding
programs, as well as continuing the reputation for health and easy companionship that the mini enjoys.

Miniatures are quickly gaining in popularity among Agility, Flyball and Disc competition enthusiasts as their attributes of
small size and amazing athletic ability makes them very competitive and easy to travel with. In the suburbs and cities,
families wanting a big dog are attracted to the "big dog" qualities of the miniature Australian Shepherd, in a smaller
package.

I have always had a great love for animals. 
I have been raising these wonderful little dogs for over 40years although I have had many Aussies on the ranches before then.  I
wanted a name to signify the qualities in these little dogs so I came up with the name
Boldheart and first registered it in  1999.